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      August 2016

dragani Martone Studio conceives a Net Zero addition to a mid-century modern residence.
The house, originally designed by architect Barnet Glickler as his personal residence, is located in a suburb of Philadelphia.
 
The proposed addition is carefully sited to take advantage of its solar orientation, and natural ventilation to passively temper the home’s interior environment, while optimizing its ability to generate energy for the original house and its expanded footprint. All programmed spaces are collected under a single, broad, sweeping shed roof. An open plan connects the space of the addition with that of the original residence through the use of framed view sheds, and an axial circulation spine.
A roof mounted PV array above the addition provides for all electrical demand of the residence. Minimal space heating and cooling are delivered through a sub-soil geo-thermal well loop, and rainwater harvesting is utilized for all gray water systems, and site irrigation. The exterior envelope of the addition utilizes triple glazed windows, and SIPS panels to provide a continuous insulation that exceeds Passive House standards for thermal performance. All interior and exterior materials are sustainably sourced. Water saving plumbing fixtures, and LED source light fixtures are used throughout the project.
The design for the project’s interior finishes palette responds to elements of the 1950s original interior design, but it is also stirred by the current owners’ art collection, and the house’s natural surroundings. A print from Richard Diebenkorn‘s Ocean Park series and the deep green foliage of the woodsy landscape that embraces the house are the inspiration for the final color palette.    
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      July 2016

dMAS transforms a former auto dealership service bay into new state-of-the art dental clinic with whimsical ex-ray mural in Philadelphia.

The broad spans, and high bays of the existing 1960’s building are integrated into the design of the new dental clinic, envisioned as a village of discretely programmed, color-coded pods situated under the umbrella of the vast existing roof canopy. Natural materials, color and daylight are employed throughout the clinic to create a calm and reposeful environment where patients can feel at ease during their visit. The craft of dentistry is a theme that is woven into the planning and architectural detailing of the project. Dental artifacts and works of fine art intermingle, and put on a visual display within the different program areas used by patients and staff.

As visitors are initially received in the reception area of the clinic, they find themselves in a gallery like space which enjoys the tall volume provided by the existing steel and metal shell.  Elements of the existing structure are strategically revealed, and concealed by newly grafted planes of wood and undulating plaster ceilings. Way finding is made simple as the dental laboratory, adult treatment rooms, and pediatric treatment rooms are each configured in discretely colored pods to announce functions housed within.

Tasked with the challenge of relocating and storing expansive archives of dental x-rays during the latter stages of the design process, the architects worked with the dentists to re-purpose the x-ray artifacts into a mural for the waiting area. The whimsical mural also acts as a diaphanous screen, introducing borrowed daylight, and a pixelated view of the x-ray installation to the pediatric treatment rooms beyond.

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2013 Sansom St. Suite 3
Philadelphia, PA 19103


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      June 2016

dMAS participated in the  Saint-Gobain Parklet Design Competition during the American Institute of Architects’ National Convention in Philadelphia.
Inspired by the theme of this year’s convention, “imagine,” the dMAS team enlivened Arch Street with a whimsical pavilion that gave visitors the opportunity to re-imagine the city grid through the memories of their own experience of walking across Philadelphia’s urban spaces. The design of the installation paid homage to the rationality of Philadelphia’s city grid, while also highlighting that successful urban planning creates places for human interaction. The installation was composed of eight stick-built wood modules, stitched together with friction fittings to create a single armature over which thin, translucent, royal blue fabric was strategically placed. All components of the pavilion were fabricated off site. As visitors moved through the spaces created by the grid, they discovered a large-scale copy of the first map of the city of Philadelphia commissioned by William Penn in the 17th century. The map was carefully grafted onto wooden panels woven into the overall structure of the pavilion. Visitors had the opportunity to color on the map the areas of the city that they had experienced, re-imagining urban space based on the memory of particular shared places. While coloring, people talked to each other about their favorite spots in the city, suggesting to the out-of-town guests the route of the perfect stroll, or what they believed to be the best public spaces. As people interacted with each other, they strengthened their connection to the places they shared, collectively participating in re-imagining their city.
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Our mailing address is:
2013 Sansom St. Suite 2
Philadelphia, PA 19103


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Great Park(ing) Spaces Pop Up at AIA Convention - Property

Yesterday's pop-up parklets ran with the convention's theme of "Imagine." Here's our assessment of their imagination. "Imagine." That's the theme of this year's American Institute of Architects convention in Philadelphia. But imagine what?

 

Parklets emerge on Arch Street for AIA Convention

In the spirit of reimagining Philadelphia's streetscape, the American Institute of Architects and Saint-Gobain partnered to host the AIA Convention's first parklet design competition, the first round of which took place May 19, and continues May 20, from noon to 7 p.m at 12th and Arch streets.

 

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      May 2016


dMAS transforms a 19th century brick and timber infill structure in the Old City district of Philadelphia into a flexible office space for a design studio.
 

 
The project calls for a full renovation and vertical expansion of the one story shell to create a changeable workspace that allows for connectivity in virtually every area of the building.  The tall, light filled volume set behind the street facade offers a gallery like posture to passersby. A moveable, translucent fabric scrim conceals or exposes the larger area of the studio beyond. A critical element of the design strategy was the need to optimize natural ventilation and daylight throughout. The long interior space is bound on its east end by an operable aluminum and glass overhead door with integral vent units designed to promote cross ventilation. When in the open position, the space of the studio is connected with a rear courtyard, creating a seamless connection between interior and exterior spaces.  A second floor studio space has been added over the rear two thirds of the existing structure. The new second floor incorporates a meeting area with tiered seating that opens out to a planted roof terrace with spectacular views to the city skyline, and adjacent buildings of Old City.  The front facade is fitted with a thin veil of perforated zinc pinned to the existing brick skin, and capped by a green cornice of small variety trees set in a timber framed planter.

 
 
Every effort has been made to optimize existing assets to serve the building’s new function. All required structural interventions, new partitions, and exterior envelope improvements were carried out with wood construction in order to take advantage of this highly renewable material’s lighter carbon footprint. Thermal properties of existing walls and roofs have been upgraded to exceed current energy code requirements.  Wherever possible, locally sourced, and rapidly renewable materials have been specified for the project. Salvaged timbers have been repurposed to serve as benches in the rear courtyard and roof terrace.

 
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2013 Sansom St. Suite 2
Philadelphia, PA 19103


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March 2016
A. Lafrery and E. Duperac, Plan of Naples, 1566
 

La Pedamentina in Naples, Italy: a Case Study in Urban Connectivity.


           Recently, the City of Naples has been recovering the surviving routes of an old system of vertical pathways, reintroducing them as important connective arteries in Naples’ contemporary urban plan. This pedestrian network is characterized by a combination of 135 stairways and 69 stepped walkways, which connect the neighborhoods built on the hills of Naples with the main linear arteries of the bustling city below. Originally built in the Middle Ages, La Pedamentina is the oldest route in this system of pathways.
             dMAS walked the 141-steps of La Pedamentina on a cloudy winter day. Starting at the panoramic square in front of the Carthusian Monastery of S. Martino and ending in the crowded streets of Spaccanapoli, we walked the city top to bottom. The pathway successfully united urban strata, creating connections between very different social and spatial realities. The revival of La Pedamentina is part of a larger effort on the part of the city’s administration in collaboration with local residents’ associations to clean up and secure public spaces, to increase walkability, and improve urban connectivity in Naples. 


 
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Copyright © 2016  dragani Martone Studio | dMAS    All rights reserved.


Our mailing address is:
2013 Sansom St. Suite 2
Philadelphia, PA 19103

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dMAS February 2016 Newsletter
February 2016 

 

The Blue Bell Corporate Headquarters is under construction and slated to be completed in Summer 2016.
 




The project incorporates four floors of flexible office space designed to respond to the different needs of the single tenant's diverse corporate structure. Each floor is roughly 10,000 sf  and consists of a mix of open and closed office spaces, conference rooms and small groups work areas. The building is sited to take advantage of its broad south facing exposure and shallow depth to optimize daylight, and promote natural ventilation. The building's south facade also utilizes sun shades and deep overhangs to minimize heat gain in cooling season, and to take advantage of solar gain during heating months, reducing demand on mechanical systems. Strategically placed light wells introduce daylight while enhancing natural ventilation through chimney effect. The design of the building reflects a preference for simple forms and light-filled interior spaces, while framing views  to the gentle hills and vegetation that surround the site.


 
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2013 Sansom St. Suite 2
Philadelphia, PA 19118

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d·M A S returns to the Couvent de la Tourette in Eveux, France designed by Le Corbusier and completed in 1960.

The building projects off the side of a steep hill surrounded by open fields and pastures. It extends parallel to the horizon line and hovers over the ground supported by pillars, slender pilotis, and openwork concrete shells. As a self-contained monastic retreat, the building was designed to respond to a unique program shaped by long-standing traditions and ideals first established in the Middle Ages, but Le Corbusier took some license, introducing innovative variations on an old type. In accordance with monastic traditions, he separated communal and private spaces by placing the monks’ cells along the top tier of the building, and the communal areas such as the refectory, the library, the classrooms, and the church on the lower level, but in departure from traditional layouts, the architect assembled all of these spaces around the same open courtyard. In addition, he rearranged the four sides of the arcade, which traditionally surrounded the cloister, into a cruciform composition of volumes, placed instead at the center of the court. These volumes function as connecting conduits, and become the main arteries for circulation much the same way that long corridors in traditional monastic plans connected the private spaces surrounding the cloister with the communal areas outside of it.  Le Corbusier designed the entrance to the church at the terminus of the main, longer artery. The church and its adjacent crypt are the most extraordinary and dramatic spaces in the complex. The layout of the church also reflects the architect’s adherence to traditional monastic models, featuring a single nave with unadorned walls, and sparse furnishing and decorations. However, Le Corbusier’s suggestive use of natural light brings new life to this medieval format. In the church, light filters into the dark and austere interior, penetrating the liturgical space through a high vertical opening in the wall behind the altar, and a horizontal slit at the top of the wall of the choir area. The stark formal austerity of the church is further modulated by colored light that enters the space through lateral, horizontal vents painted in bright colors, and placed just above the choir stalls. A low partition visually separates the crypt from the church, bending traditional requirements that demanded more privacy in the altar area. The crypt contains side altars illuminated by canon a lumiere that channel light through plastered tunnels painted in a variety of warm hues. The effect of changing light and the impact of color transform the church’s austere forms, infusing them with new emotional force and mystical charge; an architectural accomplishment that would have impressed even the most ascetic medieval critic. 

 

The Gladwyne house addition was featured in Philadelphia Style, Fall 2014.

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